Computational Biology Summer Program (CBSP)

Program Overview

The Tri-Institutional PhD Program in Computational Biology & Medicine (CBM) and the Office of Science Education & Training at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center invite applications for the 2021 Computational Biology Summer Program (CBSP). This 10-week program is designed to bring approximately 15 outstanding computer science/applied math undergraduate rising sophomores, juniors, and seniors interested in pursuing a career at the intersection of computer science and biomedicine for a research experience on the MSK, Weill Cornell, and Rockefeller campuses. Applicants must have computer science experience and fluency.

The 10-week program begins on June 7 and ends on August 13, 2021. We are currently anticipating holding this internship in person, but will make a final determination about virtual vs in person in the Spring. We will continue to assess New York State guidelines and will post updates here.

Students who are accepted into the CBSP will:

  • Adapt their computer science skills to answer biomedically-focused research questions in cutting-edge laboratories
  • Interact with faculty, postdoctoral fellows, and graduate students
  • Attend weekly luncheon/seminar series of presentations by faculty
  • Attend professional development workshops
  • Present a poster on their work at the end of the program

Students will receive a stipend of $6,000 for the summer. Housing is available.

CBSP is sponsored by an NCI grant to Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (1 R25 CA233208-01) and the Tri-Institutional PhD Program in Computational Biology & Medicine Program.

Download Flyer

Visit the website for more details and application information (due February 1, 2021)

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